Now showing 1 - 8 of 8
  • Publication
    De l'intérêt des textes délaissés
    Most of the tablets and the fragments from Ugarit were discovered in the spaces delimited by the ancient constructions (royal palace, private houses) and belonged to their archives. However, among these objects made in clay, some of them are not tablet and were excavated in private tombs. Two of them are particularly interesting and enable to interrogate about their function. Did they constitute a part of the funeral material?
      46  34
  • Publication
    Dossier : Recherches actuelles sur l'occupation des périphéries désertiques de la Jordanie aux périodes protohistoriques
    (2013) ;
    Haydar, Jamal
    ;
    Al-Bahloul, Khozama
    ;
    Benech, Christophe
    ;
    Bordreuil, Etienne
    ;
    Bessac, Jean-Claude
    ;
    Callot, Olivier
    ;
    Calvet, Yves
    ;
    Geyer, Bernard
    ;
    Carbillet, Aurélie
    ;
    Goiran, Jean-Philippe
    ;
    Hawley, Robert
    ;
    Herveux, Linda
    ;
    Marriner, Nick
    ;
    Onnis, Francesca
    ;
    Pardee, Dennis
    ;
    Rejiba, Fayçal
    ;
    Roche-Hawley, Carole
    ;
    Sauvage, Caroline
    ;
    Matoïan, Valérie
    ;
    Al-Maqdissi, Michel
    This report presents preliminary results from the Syrian-French archaeological mission at Ras Shamra - Ugarit for the fields seasons of 2009 and 2010. At Ras Shamra tell, the study of the the Late Bronze Age city continued at several sites ("rempart", "Grand-rue" with the excavations of a water well, "pont-barrage", area east of the royal palace), with the study of the ashlar mansonry, in addition to a new site in the so-called "Maison de Yabninu". Two others projects-soundings in the area of the so-called "Temple de Dagan" and a georadar survey - have helped to improve our knowledge of the city's urban fabric. The expedition's work also extended to the neighbouring site of Ras Ibn Hani in order to provide insights into the Holocene morphogenesis of the tombolo. Research on archaeological and epigraphic material was also undertaken in the museums of Damascus, Aleppo and Lattakia during these two campaigns
      54  30
  • Publication
    Espaces urbains à l'aube du XXIe siècle : Patrimoine et héritages culturels
    Quand l’urbanisme est au service d’une certaine philosophie de la ville engagée dans la préservation des héritages culturels, la conservation traditionnelle mais aussi la production d’un patrimoine architectural rénové prennent le pas sur d’autres forces de progrès. Ainsi, les mécanismes d’intégration ou de rejet du passé, la mémoire collective et les enjeux de pouvoirs, la valorisation des pratiques sociales traditionnelles et les icônes architecturales, la réhabilitation et la production d’espaces patrimoniaux jusqu’au rang de patrimoine mondial sont autant de questions d’actualité que cet ouvrage aborde, proposant, à travers un large panorama illustré, la découverte de différentes expressions d’aménagement urbain. Entre l’Europe, l’Afrique du Nord, le Moyen-Orient, l’Asie et le Pacifique on peut être étonné de rencontrer une certaine cohérence urbanistique qui concilie la prise en compte des facteurs géographiques, le développement architectural et la préservation des héritages culturels.
      44
  • Publication
    La restauration monumentale en question: La circulaire du 5 août 1985 relative aux études préalables et son application
    (L'Harmattan, 2011)
    L'institutionnalisation par la circulaire du 5 août 1985 des études sur les travaux de restauration des monuments classés est-elle une innovation dans la tradition du service des Monuments historiques ? A quoi fait-elle référence parmi les textes historiques et théoriques, est-elle simplement une mesure administrative ou témoigne-t-elle d'une ambition culturelle ? Le recours systématique aux études préalables a-t-il changé les modes d'intervention de la maîtrise d'oeuvre ?
      31
  • Publication
    Virtual technical analysis of archaeological textiles by synchrotron microtomography
    (2023) ;
    Iacconi, Clémence
    ;
    Autret, Awen
    ;
    Desplanques, Elsa
    ;
    Chave, Agathe
    ;
    King, Andrew
    ;
    Fayard, Barbara
    ;
    Leccia, Émilie
    ;
    Bertrand, Loïc
    Archaeological textile remains from Antiquity are rare due to their perishable nature. In certain cases, the conservation of the morphology and / or of chemical signatures can be exquisite. Detailed archaeological information on the social and cultural life of past societies, such as on funerary practices, can then be deduced from their study. In temperate climates, these cases of exceptional preservation mainly involve textiles closely associated with corroded metal artefacts (i.e. copper or iron based), through a process called mineralisation. An essential step in understanding these textiles is the study of morphometric parameters documenting their manufacturing processes, which is carried out by archaeologists under the name of technical analysis. In this article, we show how the use of high-resolution synchrotron-based microtomography (μCT) can contribute to performing a non-invasive 3D technical analysis of archaeological textiles and overpass several limitations of the conventional techniques. We show that several standard parameters (e.g. weave type, type of yarn, direction of twist, thread count) characterising the manufacturing of these ancient textiles can be determined, while some of them are very difficult to obtain using optical and electronic microscopies. In addition, the statistical representativeness of the data can be examined. The comparison between the three approachesmanual measurements either from surface microscopy or from selected virtual sections and automated analysis on 3D volumes-leads to question the differences between the quantitative results obtained. While the manual selection of measurement points is inherently associated to perceptual biases, the automated process may also come with limitations and biases which we detail in order to make the method more robust for future use. We analyse these implications by studying a textile from the locality of Le Paradis in Creney-près-Troyes (Aube, France, 5th century BC), taken as a typical case of fragmentary textile difficult to analyse by standard analytical methods.
      8  1