Now showing 1 - 6 of 6
  • Publication
    Geomorphological changes in the coastal area of Farasan Al-Kabir Island (Saudi Arabia) since mid Holocene based on a multi-proxy approach
    (Elsevier Ltd, 2018) ; ;
    Koukousioura, O.
    ;
    Triantaphyllou, M.
    ;
    Vandarakis, D.
    ;
    Marion de Procé, S.
    ;
    Chondraki, V.
    ;
    Kapsimalis, V.
    The geomorphological evolution of the southeastern coastal area of Farasan Al-Kabir Island (Saudi Arabia) is revealed by the mapping of modern landforms and a multi-proxy and high spatial resolution study including grain size, particulate organic carbon, mineralogy, element geochemistry, benthic foraminifera analysis and radiocarbon dating of a 3.3-m long sediment core. The modern geomorphological features comprise a variety of arid landforms, such as plateau, cliffs and pediments of Pleistocene coral limestones, playa depressions located on plateau surfaces, alluvial fans, butte and sandy beaches. The mid Holocene evolution of the borehole area is resulted from the detailed analysis of five sedimentary units detected along the core Matar-1, and includes three distinct stages: (a) from 5253 ± 223 y cal BP to 3138 ± 223 y cal BP, carbonate coarse-grained material consisting of coral fragments, molluscs, calcareous algae and benthic foraminifera are deposited on a shallow marine fringing reefal platform, which becomes progressively a nearshore backreef (around 3675 ± 215 y cal BP), and later (around 3138 ± 223 y cal BP) a reef ramp; (b) since 3040 ± 220 y cal BP the borehole area obtains the characteristics of a high-energy beach that receives increasing inputs of terrigenous material; (c) subsequently, a supratidal backshore setting is established influenced mostly by terrestrial processes and occasionally by marine processes, as it is indicated by the decreasing and sometimes sporadic presence of benthic foraminifera, and recently, a sedimentary veneer consisting of terrigenous, carbonate and evaporite material is formed by terrestrial, mainly wadi and aeolian, processes. © 2018 Elsevier Ltd and INQUA
    Scopus© Citations 6  205
  • Publication
    Long-term sea level changes in the Saronic and Southern Euboean Gulfs
    (Archaeopress, 2020) ;
    Fachard, Sylvian
    ;
    Knodell, A.R.
    ;
    Vandarakis, D.
    ;
    Kapsimalis, V.
      83  79
  • Publication
    Prediction of Soil Loss in a Reservoir Watershed Using an Erosion Model and Modern Technological Tools: A Case Study of Marathon Lake, Attica in Greece
    (2020) ;
    Kapsimalis, V.
    ;
    Evelpidou, Niki
    ;
    Apostolopoulos, G.
    ;
    Xanthakis, M
    ;
    Xanthopoulos, G
    ;
    Panagiotis, S
    Marathon Lake is an artificial reservoir with great environmental, ecological, social, and economic significance because it was the main source of water for Athens, the capital of Greece, for many years. The present study details the first attempt to map sedimentation in Marathon Lake in detail, using bathymetric mapping and soil erosion field surveying of the torrent watershed areas. First, the results of a bathymetric survey carried out in 2011 were compared with topographic maps that pre-date the construction of the dam. Based on this comparison, an estimated 8.34 hm3 of sediment have been deposited in the 80 years since the dam’s construction. In the current survey, the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) was used to estimate soil loss in the watershed area of the streams that end in Marathon Lake. The estimated value from the RUSLE was substantially lower (3.02 hm3) than that calculated in the bathymetric survey.
      96  56
  • Publication
    Retrieval of nearshore bathymetry in the Gulf of Chania, NW Crete, Greece, from WorldWiew-2 multispectral imagery
    (SPIE, 2018) ;
    Drakopoulou, P.
    ;
    Kapsimalis, V.
    ;
    Parcharidis, I.
    Shallow water bathymetry is recognized as one of the most fundamental topics in environmental studies, seabed morphology research and management of the coastal zone. The detailed mapping as well as the long-term monitoring of the changes in shallow marine relief is important for the successful completion of coastal construction and environmental projects. In recent years, optical satellite imagery is proving to be a useful tool to determine coastal bathymetry, as it provides a time- A nd cost-effective solution to water depths estimation. In this paper, the two most popular and successful approaches for bathymetry retrieval, the Lyzenga (1985) linear bathymetry model and the Stumpf et al. (2003) ratio method, have been applied to Worldview-2 satellite imagery, in order to derive the more accurate bathymetric model for the shallow-water region of the Chania Gulf, located in NW Crete Island, Greece. This area is sea-grass free and is dominated by sandy substrate with a few rocky outcrops. The models are implemented over the total study area-no separation in subareas according to the bottom type. The results are compared with echo sounding ground truth depth data. The outcomes of the statistical analysis indicate that the linear model provides increased accuracy than the ratio one over the sandy bottom. On the contrary, in those parts covered by rocky bottoms, none of the two models provided satisfactory results. © 2018 SPIE.
    Scopus© Citations 2  49
  • Publication
    Vertical displacement trends in the Aegean coastal zone (NE Mediterranean) during the Holocene assessed by geo-archaeological data
    (2012) ;
    Theodorakopoulou, K.
    ;
    Kapsimalis, V.
    ;
    Panagiotopoulos, I.P.
    Trends in the vertical displacement (i.e. uplift or subsidence) of the Aegean Sea coastal zone have been assessed by comparing observational data with those derived from the predictive glacio-hydro-isostatic model of Lambeck and Purcell (2005) for a period spanning from the Mesolithic to the late Roman times. The data base comprises published studies that use both geomorphological (with associated biological material) and archaeological sea level indicators/markers. Localities demonstrating uplift of high amplitude were detected in front of the Hellenic Arc (Antikythira, Crete, Rhodes, Nisyros) and in the northeast Aegean region (Thrace), whilst areas experiencing tectonic subsidence were mainly observed in the central Aegean region which is characterized by an extensional tectonic domain. However, regional-scale tectonic particularities have caused uplift in parts of the west and east coast of central Aegean. Tectonically 'stable' sites can be found in the Cyclades Plateau, however, this is due to a balance between uplifting and subsiding movements. Sediment compaction and sediment loading may have affected districts with high sedimentation rates such as the Thessaloniki Plain-Thermaikos Gulf (NW Aegean). Finally, tectonic fragmentation of the coastal area in Minor Asia is responsible for localised uplifting and subsiding events. © The Author(s) 2011.
    Scopus© Citations 60  617  62