Now showing 1 - 6 of 6
  • Publication
    Geoarchaeological survey in the Wādī al-Kabīr basin, Wilāyāt Ibrī, Oman: A preliminary report (poster)
    (Archaeopress, 2014)
    Desruelles, Stéphane
    ;
    ;
    Kondo, Y.
    ;
    Beuzen-Waller, T.
    ;
    Miki, T.
    ;
    Noguchi, A.
    This paper reports on the geoarchaeological survey in the Wādī al-Kabīr basin, located in the southern piedmont of the al-Hajar mountains, to the north-east of Ibrī, Oman. The goal of the survey was to understand the spatial patterns of human occupation of the region during the Late Pleistocene and Holocene, paying special attention to the development of landscape and topography. The survey comprised archaeological and geomorphological explorations. Both approaches employed satellite remote sensing and GIS-based mapping of surface features. From the geomorphological viewpoint, the survey area was an alluvial plain washed and surrounded by two major wadis - Wādī al-Kabīr and Wādī Khuwaybah. In this area, the archaeological team documented twenty-three sites and scatters. Middle to Late Palaeolithic artefacts were identified in the piedmont areas, while Holocene lithics, characterized by Fasad points, end-scrapers, and drills, were scattered on residual hills and terraces. The team identified a total of 246 cairns, most of which look like Hafit-type tombs. Some of the cairns were associated with lithic concentration. There was a Bronze Age and Islamic settlement on the terrace between the two wadis. At that site, called al-HasT, the team mapped at least five Bronze Age towers, two Umm an-Nar type graves, enclosure walls, irrigation channels with an aqueduct bridge, bunds to prevent floods, and traces of crop field boundaries and buildings. The results of systematic surface collection and soil sampling in the northern sector suggested that a Bronze Age settlement is probably present underneath the crop fields of the Islamic period.
      142
  • Publication
    Using the geo-archaeological approach to explain past urban hazards
    (Taylor & Francis, 2013)
    The first cities emerged in the Middle East around the year 3000 BC. The geo-archaeological approach allows us to study environmental processes in an archaeological context and thus to identify the past urban hazards. There is much to be gained: these studies are fundamental to a better understanding of present-day hazards, to urban development, but also to remembering our heritage. Cities have always been susceptible to nature's risks and natural disasters, but have also - through urban development and through the close proximity of great numbers of human beings-, thrown up their own hazards.
      449
  • Publication
    Jabal al-'Aluya: An inland Neolithic settlement of the late fifth millennium BC in the Ādam area, Sultanate of Oman
    (Archaeopress, 2013) ;
    Beuzen-Waller, T.
    ;
    Lemee, M.
    ;
    Giraud, J.
    ;
    Gernez, G.
    Jabal al-'Aluya is a Neolithic site located at the foot of Jabal Salekh near Ādam, Sultanate of Oman. The evidence of dispersed occupation across the 65 ha of the site comprises 139 structures and lithic concentrations, including numerous Neolithic bifacial chert tools. Excavation of a U-shaped stone-hut dwelling in one of the three main zones of occupation at the site recorded post holes, a fireplace, and a pit with what is believed to be a grinding tool. The site is close to water and raw material sources, and geomorphological studies show that it is well preserved despite deflation. The location of the settlement in the inland region of Oman makes it all the more interesting and significant for our understanding of the Neolithic period in south-eastern Arabia, as almost all Neolithic sites excavated to date are located near the coastline.
      153  6